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Ryanair to abolish check-in desks



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 11:23 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,alt.travel.uk.air
Mel Rowing
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

On Feb 22, 9:41*am, Roland Perry wrote:

Passport control is nothing to do with airlines.


Of course it is. If the airline flies someone who does not have the
credentials to enter the destination country, they get a hefty fine from
the authorities (as well as having to arrange to take them back).


If a passenger does not have the appropriate documentation he will not
be boarded that much is true.

However, airlines do not make the decision as to who shall or shall
not be admitted to any country. That is why you go through an
immigration procedure. Clearance by an airline for boarding does not
guarantee entrance at your destination.

If it's a low-cost doing a 25 minute turnaround, the plane will usually
be long gone by the time the passenger has "failed" immigration checks.


In which case the return flight will be fully boarded and probably
taken off before all immigration procedures have been completed with
respect to the previous incoming flight. There is no requirement for
them to carry out a refused entrant on the next possible flight which
might, in any case, be full. They do of course have to carry them out
eventually and no doubt there is a time limit but the refused entrant
will be detained until he is carried out.

  #22  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 11:25 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,rec.travel.europe
Lüko Willms
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Posts: 17
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

Am Sun, 22 Feb 2009 09:23:34 UTC, schrieb Mel Rowing
auf uk.railway :

Passport control is nothing to do with airlines.

They check your passport at the boarding gate anyway to ensure that
you are the person named on the boarding pass.


No, why should they?

The check the passport to make sure that the passenger is entitled
to enter the country where the flight goes to, so that they avoid fees
by the destination country immigration authorities and the costs of
transport back.

Some countries, like the USA oblige the airlines also with much more
of their surveillance demands, like providing 35 or more data of the
passenger even before the aircraft has started. So the airline does
check the passport not because it wants, but because some government
wants it.


Cheers,
L.W.

-- -----------------------------------------------------

  #23  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 11:43 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,alt.travel.uk.air
Roland Perry[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 510
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

In message
, at
02:23:03 on Sun, 22 Feb 2009, Mel Rowing
remarked:
On Feb 22, 9:41*am, Roland Perry wrote:

Passport control is nothing to do with airlines.


Of course it is. If the airline flies someone who does not have the
credentials to enter the destination country, they get a hefty fine from
the authorities (as well as having to arrange to take them back).


If a passenger does not have the appropriate documentation he will not
be boarded that much is true.


Exactly so. It is that documentation check which will become more
"interesting" after Ryanair abolishes check-in desks.

However, airlines do not make the decision as to who shall or shall
not be admitted to any country. That is why you go through an
immigration procedure. Clearance by an airline for boarding does not
guarantee entrance at your destination.


Of course. But no-one said it did.

If it's a low-cost doing a 25 minute turnaround, the plane will usually
be long gone by the time the passenger has "failed" immigration checks.


In which case the return flight will be fully boarded and probably
taken off before all immigration procedures have been completed with
respect to the previous incoming flight.


That's what I mean by "the plane will usually be long gone by the time
the passenger has "failed" immigration checks."

There is no requirement for them to carry out a refused entrant on the
next possible flight which might, in any case, be full. They do of
course have to carry them out eventually and no doubt there is a time
limit but the refused entrant will be detained until he is carried out.


Indeed, and if they fly to that destination just once a day it'll be a
long wait.
--
Roland Perry
  #24  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 11:49 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,rec.travel.europe,alt.travel.uk.air
Roland Perry[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 510
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

In message
, at
11:25:24 on Sun, 22 Feb 2009, Lüko Willms
remarked:
They check your passport at the boarding gate anyway to ensure that
you are the person named on the boarding pass.


No, why should they?


Quite simply, on a commercial level, to prevent people reselling
tickets.

In more recent times, terrorist concerns mean that the airlines (and not
just the governments) want to make sure that the people travelling are
the same people who checked bags into the hold.

And probably more than you expect, so that various "no fly" lists can be
interrogated (not least those of the airline itself if they have banned
an unruly passenger).
--
Roland Perry
  #25  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 12:04 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,alt.travel.uk.air
pete
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 09:36:39 +0000, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:04:04 on Sun,
22 Feb 2009, Neil Williams remarked:
That's a somewhat different agenda, and could be assisted by allowing a
much more generous carry-on allowance.


The issue with this, apart from that it's the Government and BAA that
restrict it by size and to 2 items (all airports now?),


The "2 items" is a bid to reduce security queues, but I don't think the
*airports* have an agenda to restrict carry-on size, other than as part
of a general agreement with the airlines. In fact I think Heathrow is
the only airport where I've seen the "does your bag fit" gauges (in the
transit area) and policed by security people - rather than at the
check-in desk or the gate and policed by the airline staff.

From my observations at EMA, the gate gauges are used primarily to
extract some extra revenue from passengers whose bags are half an inch
too big, rather than to trap those people with hugely oversize bags.


Some pax really do take the **** with what they try to drag onto a plane.

Since the cheapo airlines charge a lot (in comparison to the cost of a
seat) for hold baggage, as you can't use the online checkins, there are
a lot of people who will squeeze *everything* into carry-on. From my
personal experience, the limitation to the number of people you can get
on a low-cost flight is not the number of seats, but the amount of
overhead stowage. It seems to me very unsafe - to have people with
vast amounts of carry-on on a flight, so restricting it gets my vote.


is that there won't be room for it all.


Easyjet seems to cope.

Didn't Ryanair announce recently that even your shopping has to fit in
the "one bag" in order to try to reduce this issue?


I noticed such a rule, didn't know how new it was.


It's certainly being enforced now. I came back from Murcia recently
and I saw three women who's bags were too big. They were being told
they had to go in the hold (the bags, not the women) and were not
happy, as a result.
  #26  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 12:19 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc
Runge13[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 495
Default Happy michaelnewport, nice crosspost copy/paste to get more answers

People are queer, this one just sends an article but has nothing to say
about it.
Absolutely nothing.

"Lord Truscott of Brownenvelope" a écrit dans le
message de
...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7903656.stm
Ryanair to abolish check-in desks
Ryanair aircraft
Ryanair says it wants to abolish check-in desks to save money

Ryanair has confirmed it plans to close all of its airport check-in
desks by the end of the year in a bid to reduce the cost of its
flights.

From the start of 2010, all Ryanair passengers will need to check in
online in order to confirm their flights.

Officials at the Irish airline said that, by reducing its costs at
airports, savings will be passed on to passengers through lower fares.

The carrier said that 75% of its passengers already checked in online.

Spokesman Stephen McNamara said the airline saw the move as the
"logical next step" in an effort to pass on savings to passengers
through reduced fares.

Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary told the Daily Telegraph that
passengers will be able to leave their luggage at a bag drop but
otherwise everything will be done online.

"Ultimately, we want just one in five people to check in luggage," he
said.

The carrier said that 97% of passengers booked online already and 75%
used the internet to check in.



  #27  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 01:26 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,alt.travel.uk.air
tim.....
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,591
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks


"pete" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 09:36:39 +0000, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:04:04 on Sun,
22 Feb 2009, Neil Williams remarked:
That's a somewhat different agenda, and could be assisted by allowing a
much more generous carry-on allowance.

The issue with this, apart from that it's the Government and BAA that
restrict it by size and to 2 items (all airports now?),


The "2 items" is a bid to reduce security queues, but I don't think the
*airports* have an agenda to restrict carry-on size, other than as part
of a general agreement with the airlines. In fact I think Heathrow is
the only airport where I've seen the "does your bag fit" gauges (in the
transit area) and policed by security people - rather than at the
check-in desk or the gate and policed by the airline staff.

From my observations at EMA, the gate gauges are used primarily to
extract some extra revenue from passengers whose bags are half an inch
too big, rather than to trap those people with hugely oversize bags.


Some pax really do take the **** with what they try to drag onto a plane.


OTOH same airlines TTP with what they *won't* allow you to take.

I once tried to carry on a very small bag on an Air Berlin flight and the
check in staff wouldn't let me because it was a kilo over their ridiculously
tiny weight allowance (5K IIRC) I had to stand there and remove all the
heavy, but small Items, and stuff them into my coat pockets (fortunately it
was spring and I was wearing one!)

tim




  #28  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 01:29 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,alt.travel.uk.air
tim.....
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,591
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks


"Mel Rowing" wrote in message
...
On Feb 22, 9:41 am, Roland Perry wrote:

Passport control is nothing to do with airlines.


Of course it is. If the airline flies someone who does not have the
credentials to enter the destination country, they get a hefty fine from
the authorities (as well as having to arrange to take them back).


If a passenger does not have the appropriate documentation he will not
be boarded that much is true.

However, airlines do not make the decision as to who shall or shall
not be admitted to any country. That is why you go through an
immigration procedure. Clearance by an airline for boarding does not
guarantee entrance at your destination.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

But the airline still has the task of ensuring that the traveller has the
correct documentation. This is the major reason why people get refused
entry and the immigration departments have given this task to the carrying
airline.

tim


  #29  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 01:47 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc,alt.travel.uk.air
Roland Perry[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 510
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

In message , at 11:04:38 on Sun, 22
Feb 2009, pete remarked:
From my observations at EMA, the gate gauges are used primarily to
extract some extra revenue from passengers whose bags are half an inch
too big, rather than to trap those people with hugely oversize bags.


Some pax really do take the **** with what they try to drag onto a plane.


The person in front of me today had a trolley-bag that was clearly
larger than the allowance (as well as a handbag). But the security
people didn't turn a hair; but then neither did they when what looked
like two off-duty immigration officials jumped the queue, set off the
metal detectors, and didn't even stop walking.

I thought airside personnel were supposed to "go through security" in
the sense of being checked out in the same way as passengers, not just
"that's the door they have to go through, but no checks made".

Since the cheapo airlines charge a lot (in comparison to the cost of a
seat) for hold baggage, as you can't use the online checkins, there are
a lot of people who will squeeze *everything* into carry-on.


Easyjet seems to cope.


I'll report back on my Easyjet flight today. Last week's Ryanair flight
was about 80% full (as per their average loading) and there was plenty
of room in the overheads, and almost nothing under any seats. [iirc the
official maximum size of a carry-on is also supposed to fit under a
seat, although that won't leave much room for feet.]

Didn't Ryanair announce recently that even your shopping has to fit in
the "one bag" in order to try to reduce this issue?


I noticed such a rule, didn't know how new it was.


It's certainly being enforced now. I came back from Murcia recently
and I saw three women who's bags were too big. They were being told
they had to go in the hold (the bags, not the women)


I thought you were onto something there...

and were not happy, as a result.


One lady on my Ryanair flight had to pack her handbag inside her
rollerbag, to prove it would fit. Again, not happy, but if I couldn't
read, I think I'd be unhappy most of the time.
--
Roland Perry
  #30  
Old February 22nd, 2009, 01:49 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,uk.railway,uk.politics.misc
Chris Game
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Ryanair to abolish check-in desks

On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 01:23:34 -0800 (PST), Mel Rowing wrote:

I think I have had my last flight with Ryanair. It's no longer the
deal it used to be. My latest jaunt was by Swiss International
from London City. I can recommend London City over the others for
a start. My flight took me straight into a main airport and not
one 100 miles away.We thus saved on transport costs at the other
end, We had an allocated seat and refreshments were served en
route. It cost us just over £30 extra.


If that was Easyjet to Geneva it would double the cost of the
flight!

--
Chris Game

The generation of random numbers is too important to be left
to chance. -Robert R. Coveyou Oak Ridge National Laboratory
 




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